Important New TCM Book Translation

This 976 page book is the labor of many years of work and is of great importance to the English language body of work on Traditional Chinese Medicine.

From the publisher’s website:

Written by Cheng Wuji and published in 1144, this is a complete commentary on the entire text of On Cold Damage (the Shang Han Lun) in the Song dynasty order. The entire text means that Cheng’s commentary includes the four chapters on the pulse, as well as the chapters on the prohibitions in the back of the Shang Han Lun. All told this adds another 250 lines of text to what has been accepted in the West as the Shang Han Lun. In addition to Cheng Wuji’s commentary, Jonathan Schell has annotated and translated Cheng’s lines with over 1600 lines from the Su Wen, 500 lines from the Ling Shu, 22 Difficulties from the Nan Jing, numerous passages from the Classic of the Pulse (Mai Jing), and commentary from Zhang Jingyue’s Lei Jing, Zhang Zhicong’s commentaries on the Su Wen and Ling Shu, Wang Bing’s commentary on the Su Wen, and as well as numerous other Shang Han Lun commentators. This books has been produced in full color, where the color has been used to show the attributed and unattributed quotes which the commentators use to illustrate their points. This book also includes 52 illustrations with commentary by the translator, 35 of which were composed by Cheng Wuji and 17 which have been composed by Jonathan Schell. This book illustrates the pinnacle of classical thought, where the reader, through the annotations can trace Cheng’s thought process and apply the canonical texts of Chinese medicine, as cited by Cheng, to the understanding of the Shang Han Lun.

New Book: Herbal Allies by Robert Rogers

The following quote comes from the Publisher’s page about this book:

Chronicling more than forty-five years of his intimate relationship with the plant world, Robert Rogers describes the journey that led him to become an herbalist and shares his deep knowledge of the twenty plants that form the soul of his medicine kit. Rogers weaves personal experience, observations, and knowledge from indigenous healers, and many years of expertise from his practice as a professional herbalist and clinical professor to present a unique and fascinating narrative that not only limns one man’s vital connection to plants but also provides invaluable information on effectively using plant medicine for the prevention and treatment of a variety of health conditions.

Organized in chapters according to the optimum harvest seasons as determined by the Cree lunar cycles, the twenty plants include familiar trees such as the aspen, birch, spruce, and poplar as well as lesser-known small plants such as Labrador tea, cow parsnip, and buffalo berry. Each plant is introduced and described, and its specific merits, qualities, and usages are presented through the author’s personal experiences, in traditional practices by indigenous cultures, modern commercial uses, the author’s professional clinical treatments, the medicinal constituents of each plant, homeopathic applications, and recipes using various parts of the plants. Detailed photos of each plant provide reliable identification. Rogers also conveys common names, tips for collection, and observations on the personality traits and spiritual properties of the plants. Poems, stories, and legends from different cultures round out portraits of the plants as living beings that speak to us in a language we need to learn.

Two Recent Books on American Health Care

Salt Reduction Questioned

We have not read or reviewed this book yet but hopefully it’s one we will get to. The traditional systems of health respected the role of salt in digestion and health and had a healthy balance with it.

Matthew Wood’s New Book The Earthwise Herbal Repertory

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I’m a bit late to announce this book that came out in November of 2016.  I own 6 of his 8 excellent books and while his approach is different than mine and from most of the herbalists I study (in that he utilizes homeopathy) it’s this very difference that I find valuable.

Internationally known herbalist Matthew Wood takes the guesswork out of the application of medicinal plants and provides an invaluable cross-reference of constitutional types, energetic categories, and specific symptoms that helps the herbalist narrow down the number of possible remedies for a specific condition. Unlike many reference books in which medicinal plants are defined simply by condition or disease name, this book contains tools to differentiate between remedies and analyze each case in a holistic fashion. While this system of cross-referencing is well known to homeopaths, it is less frequently used by herbalists; The Earthwise Herbal Repertory seeks to bridge the gap between different systems, incorporating knowledge from ancient Greek and traditional Native American medicine, nineteenth-century botanical medicine, homeopathy, and modern biomedical research. This definitive repertory proves useful for homeopaths and herbalists, professionals and home practitioners alike.

Herbalist Michael Tierra Reviews the Book “Eat Wheat”

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Michael Tierra provides a review of this book by an author we are not familiar with.  It sounds like the premise of the book is that weak digestion and improper diet result in an impaired ability to digest wheat and dairy and this can be addressed.  This author reportedly attempts to combine Ayurvedic approaches with modern research and clinical experience.

No More Sugar

I’m usually not a fan of extreme recommendations or all or nothing recommendations, but perhaps this message will serve the purpose of warning people about sugar:

As a reminder we have a forum thread about sugar.

What Our Ancestors Ate And Why It Matters Today

Todd Caldecott’s Food as Medicine is our favourite book on the subject of food but this new addition looks interesting:

 

Ayurveda and Acupuncture

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While Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda are unique systems, there are parallels and commonalities and they likely have shared roots.

Ayurvedic acupuncture is not nearly as well known as its Chinese counterpart.  Thus we are grateful for Dr. Frank Ros’s efforts to make it better known and map out the congruencies with traditional Chinese medicine.

Ayurvedic Acupuncture (also called Siravedhana by Sushruta) is based upon the Suchi Veda, a 3,000 year old Vedic text which, in the Ayurvedic system, is the Science of Acupuncture. It has been practiced as an accessory therapy since it was used in conjunction with other forms to effect healing. It belongs more correctly to the branch of surgery, one of the eight medical disciplines of Ayurveda.

More information can be found at the International Academy of Ayurvedic Acupuncture.

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