The Arrogance of Preventive Medicine

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David Sackett, who has been affectionately called the father of evidence-based medicine, died on May 13, 2015 at age 80.

While still adhering to many aspects of allopathic medicine and the reductionist paradigms of modern science, praise must be given for his willingness to challenge the main stream of medicine and its methodology when it did not base its findings on evidence, especially in the form of randomized clinical trials.

We would like to share a short paper of his to give a taste for his approach: The Arrogance of Preventive Medicine

I place the blame directly on the medical “experts” who, to gain private profit (from their industry affiliations), to satisfy a narcissistic need for public acclaim or in a misguided attempt to do good, advocate “preventive” manoeuvres that have never been validated in rigorous randomized trials.

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Breakthrough Brain and Muscle Rejuvenating Drug?

ageing

This is early phase research, but Researchers at UC Berkeley have discovered a drug that rejuvenates old stems in the brains and muscles of mice.

You can read about this on Science Alert: Scientists have identified a drug that rejuvenates ageing muscle and brain tissue

Or the UC Berkeley Press release: Drug perks up old muscles and aging brains

Or from the journal article itself in Oncotarget: Systemic attenuation of the TGF-β pathway by a single drug simultaneously rejuvenates hippocampal neurogenesis and myogenesis in the same old mammal

From the press release:

We established that you can use a single small molecule to rescue essential function in not only aged brain tissue but aged muscle,” said co-author David Schaffer, director of the Berkeley Stem Cell Center and a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering. “That is good news, because if every tissue had a different molecular mechanism for aging, we wouldn’t be able to have a single intervention that rescues the function of multiple tissues.

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The Future of Medicine?

genomics

As strange as it feels to be referring an article about medical innovation from Fox News, the story is too interesting not to share.

It’s about a medical student who gets leukemia, receives treatment, and the leukemia eventually comes back.  He ends up having his entire genome sequenced which results in a gene abnormality being discovered.  This discovery becomes the indication to use a particular drug known to target the specific gene he has in higher than average amounts.  This was with the assistance of IBM’s Waston supercomputer and their genomic analytics.

This used the stuff of science fiction.  But it’s achievable now.  It’s not clear how many years it will take before this kind of technology is available to the average person, but clearly this is a promising direction.  It doesn’t eliminate the need for us to detoxify our environment or make healthy diet and lifestyle decisions.  But we must be open to the explorations and findings from modern health studies.

You can read more on the article page: How IBM’s Watson supercomputer is battling cancer with advanced genomics

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Metabolic Syndrome

We have a thread on our forum titled Metabolic Syndrome / Syndrome X / Insulin Resistance.  Thankfully several esteemed herbalist have written about this common condition.  An estimated 86 million American adults have prediabetes.  Only a partial number of those with insulin resistance will go on to develop diabetes but insulin resistance itself will cause a host of other problems.

Paul Bergner, from his article on Syndrome X, provides us the salient warning that treatment must be carried out with discipline:

The treatment has three legs, all of which must be done simultaneously:

-Supplement the nutritional factors whose deficiencies lead to insulin resistance.

-Enagage in a minimum of 15-20 minutes of resistance-type exercise most days.

-Eat a low carbohydrate diet.