Sorrow Has an Ending

sorrow

Sorrow follows us like our shadow, and we do not seem to be able to resolve it. Sorrow has an ending, but it does not come about through any system or method. There is no sorrow when there is perception of ‘what is’. When you see very clearly what is whether it be the fact that life has no fulfilment, or the fact that your son, your brother, or your husband is dead; when you know the fact as it actually is, without interpretation, without having an opinion about it, without any ideation, ideals, or judgements, then I think there is the ending of sorrow.

– Jiddu Krishnamurti

Thought Prevents Insight

jiddu_krishnamurti_walking

It is astonishingly beautiful and interesting, how thought is absent when you have an insight. Thought cannot have an insight. It is only when the mind is not operating mechanically in the structure of thought that you have an insight. Having had an insight, thought draws a conclusion from that insight. And then thought acts and thought is mechanical. So I have to find out whether having an insight into myself, which means into the world, and not drawing a conclusion from it is possible. If I draw a conclusion, I act on an idea, on an image, on a symbol, which is the structure of thought, and so I am constantly preventing myself from having insight, from understanding things as they are.

– Jiddu Krishnamurti

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Silence is Not Built Up Through Practice

jiddu_krishnamurti

Disciplines, renunciations, detachments, rituals, the practice of virtue,all these, however noble, are the process of thought, and thought can only work toward an end, toward an achievement, which is ever the known. Achievement is security, the self-protective certainty of the known. To seek security in that which is nameless is to deny it. The security that may be found is only in the projection of the past, of the known. For this reason, the mind must be entirely and deeply silent; but this silence cannot be purchased through sacrifice, sublimation, or suppression.This silence comes when the mind is no longer seeking, no longer caught in the process of becoming. This silence is not cumulative, it may not be built up through practice. This silence must be as unknown to the mind as the timeless, for if the mind experiences the silence, then there is the experiencer who is the result of past experiences, who is cognizant of a past silence, and what is experienced by the experiencer is merely a self-projected repetition. The mind can never experience the new, and so the mind must be utterly still.
The mind can be still only when it is not experiencing, that is, when it is not terming or naming, recording or storing up in memory. This naming and recording is a constant process of the different layers of consciousness, not merely of the upper mind. But, when the superficial mind is quiet, the deeper mind can offer up its intimations. When the whole consciousness is silent and tranquil, free from all becoming – which is spontaneity – then only does the immeasurable come into being.

Jiddu Krishnamurti

There Is No Place at Which to Arrive

Jiddu_Krishnamurti

Can humility be practiced? Surely, to be conscious that you are humble is not to be humble. You want to know that you have arrived. This indicates, does it not, that you are listening in order to achieve a particular state, a place where you will never be disturbed, where you will find everlasting happiness, permanent bliss. But as I said previously, there is no arriving, there is only the movement of learning and that is the beauty of life. If you have arrived, there is nothing more. And all of you have arrived, or you want to arrive, not only in your business, but in everything you do; so you are dissatisfied, frustrated, miserable. Sirs, there is no place at which to arrive, there is just this movement of learning which becomes painful only when there is accumulation. A mind that listens with complete attention will never look for a result because it is constantly unfolding; like a river, it is always in movement. Such a mind is totally unconscious of its own activity, in the sense that there is no perpetuation of a self, of a “me,” which is seeking to achieve an end.

– Jiddu Krishnamurti

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Dr. Horton’s Damning Statement on Modern Medical Research

The Aspen Institute organized the presentation of the 2013 Global Leaders Council for Reproductive Health Award in Geneva on the margins of the 66th World Health Assembly. The Gambia, Kenya, Zambia and Sierra Leone were recognized for their achievements as part of a USAID funded effort to recognize and encourage improvements in reproductive health. HHS Assistant Secretary for Global Affairs, Dr. Nils Daulaire and USAID Assistant Administrator for Global Health, Dr. Ariel Pablos-Méndez spoke at the event which was broadcasted live on the web by the U.S. Mission Public Affairs team. U.S. Mission Geneva / Eric Bridiers

Dr. Richard Horton, known and respected for his role as editor of the esteemed medical journal The Lancet, has stated:

“Much of the scientific literature, perhaps half, may simply be untrue. Afflicted by studies with small sample sizes, tiny effects, invalid exploratory analyses, and flagrant conflicts of interest, together with an obsession for pursuing fashionable trends of dubious importance, science has taken a turn towards darkness.”

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Mind Is Very Powerful

papaji

Mind is very powerful. The mind suggests that you are bound and you accept it. This is the creation of samsara. Then the mind suggests to be free from samsara, and then the practice starts. This is all a concept! Nirvana is only a concept, a trap of the mind. So how do you escape this trap? When you call it a ‘trap’ you are out of it. You know by a special spontaneous knowledge that all this is just a trap of the mind. Then you understand that there is nothing to do and nowhere to go. Just be. You have come from nowhere and you will never go anywhere. — Papaji

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Intelligence is Only Possible when there is Real Freedom from the Self

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Most of us think that intelligence is the outcome of acquiring knowledge, information, experience. By having a great deal of knowledge and experience we think we shall be able to meet life with intelligence. But life is an extraordinary thing, it is never stationary; like the river, it is constantly flowing, never still. We think that by gathering more experience, more knowledge, more virtue, more wealth, more possessions, we shall be intelligent. That is why we respect the people who have accumulated knowledge, the scholars, and also the people who are rich and full of experience. But is intelligence the outcome of the `more’? What is behind this process of having more, wanting more? In wanting more we are concerned with accumulating, are we not?

Now, what happens when you have accumulated knowledge, experience? Whatever further experience you may have is immediately translated in terms of the `more’, and you are never really experiencing, you are always gathering; and this gathering is the process of the mind, which is the centre of the `more’. The `more’ is the `me’, the ego, the self-enclosed entity who is only concerned with accumulating, either negatively or positively. So, with its accumulated experience, the mind meets life. In meeting life with this accumulation of experience, the mind is again seeking the `more’, so it never experiences, it only gathers.

As long as the mind is merely an instrument of gathering, there is no real experiencing. How can you be open to experience when you are always thinking of getting something out of that experience, acquiring something more?

So the man who is accumulating, gathering, the man who is desiring more is never freshly experiencing life. It is only when the mind is not concerned with the `more’, with accumulating, that there is a possibility for that mind to be intelligent. When the mind is concerned with the `more’, every further experience strengthens the wall of the self-enclosing `me’, the egocentric process which is the centre of all conflict, please follow this. You think that experience frees the mind, but it does not. As long as your mind is concerned with accumulation, with the `more’, every experience you have only strengthens you in your egotism, in your selfishness, in your self-enclosing process of thought.

— Jiddu Krishnamurti (You can read the whole talk at J. Krishnamurti Online: Life Ahead Part One Chapter 19)

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On Disease

plato

Diseases, except where they are very dangerous, should not be irritated by drugs. For every disease has a structure that resembles in a certain manner the nature of living creatures. For the composition of these living creatures has prescribed periods of life for the species as a whole.  It is the same with the constitution of diseases; whenever anyone destroys this by drugs, contrary to the allotted period of time, many serious diseases are wont to arise from those that are few and slight. Consequently, so far as leisure permits, one should control all such diseases by regimen, instead of irritating a troublesome evil by administering drugs.  — Plato

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